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SCIE 101 - Science 101

Evaluating Sources

Scholarly vs. Popular

                          
 

 

Examples

Scholarly Journals 

Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)
Water, Science and Technology
Foreign Affairs
Science
Nature

Popular Magazines

Time
Newsweek
Psychology Today

 
Authors Researchers
Professors
Scholars
Professionals
who are usually experts in narrow fields
Journalists
Lay people
Anonymous
 
References Includes references, bibliographies or footnotes Rarely includes references, bibliographies or footnotes
 
Edited by? Submitted articles are subjected to a rigorous peer-review process by researchers, professionals and/or students of the field Submitted articles may be reviewed by journalists and lay people
 
Language Specialized language of the discipline is used
Often includes tabulated data, graphs and diagrams
Language is non-technical
 
Contents Always includes an abstract
Lengthy articles of original research
In-depth analysis of topic
Substantial book reviews
Shorter articles of general interest
Coverage of current events/news
Some brief book reviews
 
Presentation
and
Graphics
  Less flashy, more "serious" in appearance
  Advertisements are rare
  (an exception is medical journals)
  Articles are often divided into explicitly named (and sometimes   numbered) sections
More eye-catching appearance
Many pictures
Many advertisements
 
Where
Indexed?
Found in specialized indexes such as
Anthropological Index
Georef
Medline
Found in general periodical indexes such as
Academic Search Elite
Canadian Periodical Index
Reader's Guide Abstracts
(But keep in mind that general periodical indexes also include scholarly materials)