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Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG)

The Highway of Tears

The 720 kilometres between Prince Rupert and Prince George has been come to be known as the Highway of Tears for the women who have gone missing or murdered on this stretch of highway. 

The Highway of Tears website has a number of resources available for people who have lost loved ones to violence, as well as a safety toolkit for adults and youth. Read the report and recommendations from the 2006 Highway of Tears Symposium.

Some articles from newspapers the Highway of Tears:

New York Times Article

Below are some different ways that the community and government has worked to make it safer to travel on the Highway of Tears:

 "New bus service aims to make notorious Highway of Tears less dangerous" CBC Article on the buses that link the towns along the Highway of Tears.

"Province provides $360K to help Indigenous drivers secure licences" The Interior News article on funding for more drivers licences to help reduce hitchhiking along the highway

 

Responses to Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Organizations

Hashtags on Social Media

Hashtags (#) are one way people use social media to share and stay up to date on current events. Much of the MMIWG movements, awareness and information has been spread and shared through social media using hashtags. These are some of the current ones used on Twitter and Instagram to share news articles, pictures, and information about missing or murdered loved ones.

  • #MMIWG
  • #MMIW
  • #MMIW2S
  • #missingandmurdered
  • #genocide
  • #callsforjustice
  • #MMNAWG
  • #gonebutnotforgotten
  • #REDdress
  • #VAW
  • #sistersinspirit
  • #NotInvisible
  • #NoMore