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Indigenous Land Based Activism

Featured Resources

Alliances: Re/Envisioning Indigenous-Non-Indigenous Relationships edited by Lynne Davis

The contributors, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, come from diverse backgrounds as community activists and academics. They write from the front lines of struggle, from spaces of reflection rooted in past experiences, and from scholarly perspectives that use emerging theories to understand contemporary instances of alliance.  Alliances delves into the complex political and personal relationships inherent in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous struggles for social justice to provide insights into the tensions and possibilities of Indigenous-non-Indigenous alliance and coalition-building in the early twenty-first century.

Becoming an Ally: Breaking the Cycle of Oppression by Anne Bishop

Becoming an Ally looks specifically at addressing oppression in people. By narrowing the focus, Anne Bishop again raises a number of questions concerning where oppression comes from: Has it always been with us as a part of 'human nature'? What can we do to change it? What does individual healing have to do with the struggles for social justice?

Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples by Linda Tuhiwai Smith

To the colonized, the term "research" is conflated with colonialism; academic research steeped in imperialism remains a painful reality. This essential volume explores intersections of imperialism and research - specifically, the ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and tradition as "regimes of truth." Concepts such as "discovery" and "claiming" are discussed and an argument presented that the decolonization of research methods will help to reclaim control over indigenous ways of knowing and being.

Non-Indigenous Ally in SAGE Encyclopedia of Action Research

Action research is a term used to describe a family of related approaches that integrate theory and action with a goal of addressing important organizational, community, and social issues together with those who experience them. This encyclopedia brings together the many strands of action research and addresses the interplay between these disciplines by presenting a state-of-the-art overview and comprehensive breakdown of the key tenets and methods of action research as well as detailing the work of key theorists and contributors to action research.

Unsettling the Commons: Social Movements Within, Against, and Beyond Settler Colonialism by Craig Fortier

Drawing on interviews with 51 anti-authoritarian organizers to investigate what it means to struggle for "the commons" within a settler colonial context, Unsettling the Commons interrogates a very important debate that took place within Occupy camps and is taking place in a multitude of movements in North America around what it means to claim "the commons" on stolen land.

As Long as Grass Grows: The Indigenous Fight for Environmental Justice, from Colonization to Standing Rock by Dina Gilio-Whitaker

The Standing Rock protest created a spotlight on Indigenous activists, as well as underscoring how little people are educated about the longtime historical tensions between Native peoples and the mainstream environmental movement. The author makes the argument that modern environmentalists have to look to the history of Indigenous resistance for wisdom and inspiration in our common fight for a just and sustainable future.

Online Resources

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