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Citation Metrics Workshop

General Introduction

This guide is an integral part of a workshop, Citation Metrics and Research Impact, currently offered upon request. To arrange a workshop for your class, group, department, or lab, contact either sheryl.adam@ubc.ca or dean.giustini@ubc.ca.

Citation analysis is the examination of frequency (and patterns) of citations to books, journal articles, individual journals, conference proceedings, etc. that appear in the bibliographies of books, journal articles, conference proceedings and other scholarly outputs, such as software, patents and presentations.

  • Citation analysis started in the sciences in the 1960s, spreading to the social sciences and humanities in the 1970s.
  • Citation analysis uses metrics based on citation counts (e.g. journal impact factor) and statistical analysis (e.g., h-index).

Citation metrics are used to measure the impact of:

  • an individual researcher
  • an individual journal article, book, etc.
  • an individual journal
  • a department or university

Related Guides

Cautions and Concerns

Davis, Phil. How Much Citation Manipulation Is Acceptable? Scholarly Kitchen [Blog post]. May 30, 2017. Retrieved from https://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2017/05/30/how-much-citation-manipulation-is-acceptable/?informz=1

San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA). Initiated by scholars and publishers, DORA calls for elimination of the use of journal-based indicators "as a surrogate measure of the quality of individual research articles, to assess an individual scientist’s contributions, or in hiring, promotion, or funding decisions." 

Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics. Nature, 520, 429–431 (23 April 2015) doi:10.1038/520429a.  Ten principles for "best practice in metrics-based research assessment so that researchers can hold evaluators to account, and evaluators can hold their indicators to account".

Martin, B. R. (2016). Editors’ JIF-boosting stratagems – which are appropriate and which not? Research Policy, 45, 1-7. doi:10.1016/j.respol.2015.09.001

Wilsdon, J. (2016). The Metric Tide: Independent Review of the Role of Metrics in Research Assessment and Management. SAGE.

Wouters, P., Thelwall, M., Kousha, K., Waltman, L., De Rijcke, S., Rushforth, A., & Franssen, T. (2015). The metric tide: Literature review (Supplementary report I to the independent review of the role of metrics in research assessment and management). London, UK: Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE).
 

Institutional Metrics at UBC

UBC measures "scholarly production and bibliometrics (outputs)" for the institution as a whole with these metrics.

Field-Weighted Citation Impact:
This metric measures the utilization by peers of UBC research publications, through field normalized citation impact factors.
This measure, along with other bibliometric data, forms a proxy for the quality and impact of the outputs of research and
scholarship at UBC. The metric allows us to compare research quality with peer institutions around the globe. This metric
was selected to provide additional evidence to existing research funding metrics, to form a more complete indicator of the
quality and impact of the research outputs and scholarship at UBC. SciVal is the bibliometric tool used at UBC to source this
publication metric.

High Quality Publications:
This metric measures the percentage of UBC journal publications published in top quality (top 25%) journals. Along with
other research metrics, this forms a proxy for the quality and impact of the outputs of research and scholarship at UBC. This
metric was selected to provide additional evidence to existing research funding metrics, to form a more complete indicator
of the quality and impact of the research outputs and scholarship at UBC. SciVal is the bibliometric tool used at UBC to
source this publication metric."*

*Research Excellence. Goal 1: Increase the Quality and Impact of UBC's Research and Scholarship, part of Connected by Commitment: 2015-2016 Annual Report.